Why be feminine?

Friday, July 19, 2019

Hello lovely friends! I am slightly behind on the blog posts since I have been working on new video content for the upcoming weeks. I am hoping to get three new entries up for you in the upcoming days. I have noticed that the traffic on the blog has increased, and I am so happy to see that our little community is growing!

If you have not yet subscribed to my YouTube Channel, I would absolutely love it if you did! Every time I refresh my feed and see a new follower/comment/like from one of you, it makes my heart burst with joy! I am so passionate about the movement that we are trying to make on this platform and I am so blessed to know you likeminded women.

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Now, let's dive in to the topic of this entry/video. There is so much valuable advice on the internet about the ways you can express your femininity. What I have noticed however, is that there exists a lack of reasoning as to why we should seek to develop our femininity. 

My journey into discovering and developing my femininity happened as a result of burnout. As someone who went through this very turbulent time, I am always seeking to help prevent women from finding themselves in a similar situation. For this reason, I am hoping that the following tips will serve as basis for motivation on your journey in developing your femininity. I encourage you to go through the Femininity section on my blog after reading this, since it will help you take the next steps. 

Before I proceed, I want to acknowledge the importance of femininity and masculinity as complementary. This is a wonderful thing - just take a look at scientific law (opposites attract). One is not meant to be inherently better than the other. The issue lies more in the concept of balance. Operating from overpowering masculine energy as a biological female is going to, on average, take a toll on your spirit and mental health, due to the simple nature of not living in alignment with who you were born to be.

I am aware of the femininity and masculinity as a social construct debate, and this entry isn't meant to explore that topic... today. For the purpose of our conversation we are going to assume that, on average, women are designed to operate largely from their feminine energy. This does not mean that we do not possess masculine energy. Again, we are dealing with the issue of balance. Our personal balance may differ from someone else’s, even though we may share the same sex. The goal in developing our femininity is to discover our own perfect balance.

As we "progressed" through the 20th century, there existed a movement for the rejection of femininity. Femininity was determined to be a contributor in women’s oppression - women were believed to have been trapped by their feminine traits. Masculine traits are largely associated with monetary gain in our modern word; therefore, it is only rational that many women pushed aside their femininity in the pursuit of traits that allowed them to achieve societal success. The issue lies in the fact that very few people stopped to think about the repercussions of this rapid movement or to question if it indeed led to true happiness. In my opinion, we merely traded in the shackles of femininity for the constraints of a job. In my eyes, this doesn't exactly spell-out liberation. 

When you think about it, we are kind of living in a large social experiment when it comes to women living in their masculine. Masculine traits in females is a phenomena that is so now so heavily praised, that it makes it difficult for women to find a safe space to nurture their femininity. Many of us don’t even know where to start, as we are perpetually engrained with the notion that our femininity is a form of weakness contributing to our oppression. We could probably talk about the origins and societal implications of this all day, but that would require a longer entry/video. There are countless others that make an excellent argument on this topic out in the YouTube and blogging world and I encourage you to go look for them. 

Without further ado, here are a few reasons I believe developing your femininity is a worthwhile endeavour.

Why be feminine? 

1.     Feminine Power
Activating your feminine side garners you a type of freedom. When you are living in alignment with the way in which you body was created, you are living your truest life - a life that will provide you with a sense of wholeness.


Biologically, women are the physically weaker sex, but this does not mean that they are not powerful. Female power is now often confused with masculine traits: muscles, access to financial resources, competition, progress. Desiring these things isn't always a negative thing, but they do impede us from living femininely if they remain the only ways in which we measure our success.

Living in your feminine will allow you to harness your biology to your advantage. Fostering deep bonds, influencing others through genuine compassion, etc., are all examples of feminine power. Having the ability to bring people together is very manipulative (good and bad). Once you activate your feminine power, you will be surprised to see how some of your deepest desires will come to fruition through the magnetism of being able to bring people together.

2. Relationships
If you are wary about living in your feminine, I challenge you to atleast strive to do so in your intimate relationship. You don’t have to believe me when I say that it is an excellent way to build a strong marriage; I challenge you to look at the data and try it yourself. We can see that when men and women rank higher on the respective masculinity and femininity scales, they report greater marital satisfaction. In fact women and men used to be prescribed behaviour modification therapy to help them develop their femininity and masculinity as a tool to improve their marriage. Call this a product of "old times", but its success does speak for itself in some capacity.


*I would caution you to practice good scientific inquiry when looking at some newer data, simply due to the underlying bias in current academia.*

Success in marriage and relationships can be attributed to the fact that masculinity and femininity are equal and complementary. One is not controlling the other - they are merely working together, filling in personality gaps (strengths/weaknesses). Please throw away your belief that masculinity is inherently controlling- you are mistaking masculine leadership for sociopathic greed.

There are many positive characteristics of femininity that adhere to simply being a good person; an example of this would be compassion. The basis of good relationships is rooted in selflessness, and this is a rather feminine trait. 


In addition, women are givers of many things, particularly love, and we are also receivers of masculine provision. This does not have to necessarily mean that your man must be the provider of money, but could rather mean provider of love and attention. When you are operating completely from masculine energy, it is incredibly difficult to receive from your significant other. Living too much in your masculine will be energetically draining, as your will be continuously “fighting” your way through life and your intimate relationship. Two individuals operating from the same energy is bound to cause conflict; again, we are dealing with laws of physics (like repels like).

3. Homemaking
Femininity will help you become a better homemaker due to the nature of the tasks themselves. Creativity is an obvious feminine trait that can benefit your homemaking - for example, beautifying your surroundings and being resourceful. If you’re married or preparing for marriage, this is a huge asset for your husband. Opposite to what culture depicts of the wife who spends her rich husband's money, masculine, successful men do not condone frivolousness and they tend to be very concerned with successful long-term financial decisions. Your lack of care toward money will not impress this man.


In addition, homemaking has to do with exercising the practice of “caring for” things and people. You can discipline yourself in learned homemaking skills, to exercise a higher standard of “caring for”. Caring is not synonymous with compassion, but careful habits can lead to the development of strengths that elicit this virtue.



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